Cavotec MoorMaster™ achieves 200,000 moorings

Cavotec MoorMaster™ achieves 200,000 moorings

Our innovative automated mooring technology, MoorMaster™, recently passed a landmark 200,000 moorings at applications worldwide, highlighting the growing acceptance of this unique system.

MoorMaster™ is a vacuum-based automated mooring technology that eliminates the need for conventional mooring lines. Remote-controlled vacuum pads recessed in, or mounted on the quayside or pontoons, moor and release vessels in seconds.

Some 200 MoorMaster™ units, installed at 28 locations worldwide, have completed the 200,000 mooring operations at RO/RO, container and bulk handling, and lock applications; and in doing so have made mooring operations safer, more efficient, and even more environmentally sustainable.

Since its introduction in New Zealand in 1998, the award-winning technology has been steadily introduced at a variety of applications around the world including Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Norway, Oman, South Africa, the UK, and the United States.

Elsewhere, specially adapted MoorMaster™ units recently completed At Sea Demonstrations for a project with the US Navy, and we are also working on ATEX, (explosion proof), approved MoorMaster™ systems, potentially for use at LNG berths.

Two of the three applications in Norway combines our Automatic Plug-in System and one of our shore power units to automatically moor and then charge the battery power unit of a passenger and vehicle ferry – the first system of its kind anywhere in the world, powering the world’s first battery powered passenger ferry.

And in another recent development for MoorMaster™, Cavotec and global marine and energy services group Wärtsilä are to jointly develop the world’s first combined induction charging and automated mooring concept.

MoorMaster™ holds vessels off the berth producing a reduction in fender wear and tear. The system can also be used to reposition vessels along the berth without the need for tugs, mooring gangs, a pilot or vessels’ propulsion – resulting in operational improvements and reduced emissions. In some cases, the introduction of MoorMaster™ has also meant that operators have not needed to extend berth infrastructure.

Crucially, removing lines from the mooring process also makes mooring significantly safer for ship- and shoreside personnel.

As vessels are secured in a matter of seconds, compared to up to an hour with conventional techniques, MoorMaster™ also delivers significant operational efficiency gains. This also reduces the use of tugs, which also helps reduce emissions.

Click on the link below to see MoorMaster™ in operation at an iron ore application in Australia, and a passenger ferry berth in Denmark.

As MoorMaster™ goes from strength to strength, we look forward to developing and adapting this extraordinary technology further to make mooring ships safer, quicker, and more efficient. 


MoorMaster™ introduced at two UK ferry berths

MoorMaster™ to be introduced at two UK passenger ferry berths

In the latest development for our innovative MoorMaster™ mooring technology in the UK, Wightlink Ferries is to introduce the system at two of its passenger and vehicle ferry berths in Portsmouth, (on the mainland), and Fishbourne on the Isle of Wight.

“This is our first MoorMaster™ order in the UK and adds to our growing list of ferry applications in Europe,” says Ottonel Popesco, Cavotec CEO.

Cavotec will supply three MoorMaster™ MM400 units, two for installation in Portsmouth, and one in Fishbourne.

The introduction of MoorMaster™ will allow Wightlink’s new, larger vessel to use the existing berth at Portsmouth, without having to make a costly extension to it, which would have also caused difficulties for manoeuvring vessels.

MoorMaster™ is a vacuum-based automated mooring technology that eliminates the need for conventional mooring lines. Remote controlled vacuum pads recessed in, or mounted on the quayside or pontoons, moor and release vessels in seconds.

To date, some 200 MoorMaster™ units are installed at 28 locations worldwide and have completed an estimated 150,000 mooring operations at Ro/Ro, container and bulk handling, and lock applications.


Cavotec co-launches Norwegian shore power initiative

Image credit: Care of DNV GL, ©Toftenes Multivisjon.

Image credit: Care of DNV GL, ©Toftenes Multivisjon.

Following the success of electric car incentive programmes in Norway, a group of engineers, investors, and representatives from the maritime sector are teaming up to expand the use of electrically powered ships in the Nordic country.

“We supported research and development into electric cars in Norway, now we need to establish an innovation platform for the electrification of ships,” Sofus Gedde Dahl, Managing Director of Cavotec Norway, recently told Norwegian technology publication Teknisk Ukeblad.

The project, named ReCharge, is headed by leading certification and classification group DNV GL. Along with Cavotec, Port of Oslo is also partnering on the project, together with Enova, a technology- and data analytics-driven online lending company, which is contributing almost half of the project’s total NOK 1.45 million budget.

ReCharge will review the practicalities of expanding the availability of shore power at Norway’s ports, and research different power systems, such as battery-powered vessels and hybrids.

Shore power, or cold ironing, is the process of connecting ships in port to the electrical grid and switching off their engines. This reduces emissions of NOx, SOx, and particulate matter.

Cavotec has extensive experience of the design, manufacture and installation of high and low voltage ship-based, shore-based, and mobile shore power, or Alternative Maritime Power (AMP) systems. The Group first started working with AMP in the 1980s in Sweden, and has since supported customers worldwide with the technology.

The Group also developed the world’s first combined Cavotec MoorMaster™ automated mooring and AMP system for two passenger ferry berths in the Norwegian fjords. The AMP system in this application recharges batteries aboard a battery-powered passenger ferry.

ReCharge conveners say that they want to see Norway become the world leader in environmentally friendly ships. And while Norway is not an EU state, improved availability of shore power would keep it in line with conditions of an EU directive which requires all ports in the 28-member bloc to make shore power available by 2025.

“Charging options are critically important for batter-powered ships and plug-in hybrid vessels. Shore power will therefore play an increasingly important role in port infrastructure of the future,” says Project Leader Hans Anton Tvete, DNV GL.

According to DNV GL, some 40 hybrid ships are on order for Norwegian shipping lines, with a similar number of plug-in hybrid vessels also due to enter service in the coming years.

Organisers have also stressed the role of government support in expanding the availability of shore power.

“To establish shore power and associated infrastructure, we need the support of central government. The development of infrastructure is critical. Shipping lines want to see a return on their investment within a relatively short time scale,” Bjørn Vartdal, Programme Leader for Maritime Research at DNV GL told Teknisk Ukeblad.

On the technical side, Cavotec points out that despite the difference between voltages used by many ships, (60Hz), and on land, (50Hz), it is possible for growing numbers of vessels to connect to shore power.

“If we pool our expertise with fellow suppliers, customers and other stakeholders, I believe that we have the necessary technical know-how and insight to significantly broaden access to shore power,” says Gedde Dahl.

This post is based on an article that first appeared in Norwegian technology publication Teknisk Ukeblad.

Cavotec recently co-hosted the opening of the what is believed to be the first shore power application for offshore vessels in the Norwegian port of Bergen.


PEMA heads interactive seminar debates on technology trends in container handling at TOC Americas

PEMA heads interactive seminar debates on technology trends in container handling at TOC Americas

The Port Equipment Manufacturers Association (PEMA) will host several seminars at the upcoming TOC Container Supply Chain Americas exhibition held in Panama, December 4-6, where leading ports and terminals, equipment and technology suppliers will gather to discuss the future of container handling across the Americas. 

This year’s 12th TOC Americas gets underway with a PEMA-hosted forum that comprehensively explores the latest developments in terminal equipment and technology. This is the sixth fast-paced interview-style forum that PEMA has held in recent years.

It is a unique opportunity for attendees to ask direct questions to the world’s top terminal handling equipment suppliers. These interactive, unscripted sessions generate active debate and substantive discussions, and will be moderated by veteran port technology journalist Paul Avery, Associate Editor at World Cargo News.

Speakers include PEMA Safety Committee Vice Chairman Stephan Stiehler and Laurence Jones of the TT Club and ICHCA International. The PEMA Forum runs from 10:00-16:30 and all sessions are free to attend for all attendees. To download the full PEMA Forum programme, visit: www.pema.org

Click here to register as a visitor for TOC Americas, including entry to the PEMA Forum  or visit www.toc.americas.com

About PEMA

Founded in 2004, PEMA provides a forum and public voice for the global port equipment and technology sectors. The Association has see strong growth in recent years, and now has nearly 70 member companies representing all facets of the industry, including crane, equipment and component manufacturers; automation, software and technology providers; consultants and other experts. www.pema.org

 


Shipping emissions to be included in UK carbon budgets?

Shipping emissions to be included in the UK's carbon budgets?

The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) published a review this week recommending that the UK’s share of international shipping emissions should be included in climate targets and carbon budgets.

An article published by Port Technology International describes how the CCC’s recommends inclusion of shipping emissions in country’s carbon budgets, which could account for up to 11 percent of total emissions permitted under the Climate Change Act by 2050. The article also details how the review also provides a detailed assessment of the UK’s share of current international shipping emissions, projected emissions up to 2050 and estimates of the abatement potential from shipping.

Under the Climate Change Act, it is Parliament that must decide whether to include emissions from international shipping in carbon budgets. The UK’s target to reduce emissions in 2050 by 80% below 1990 levels.

At Cavotec, we always enjoy hearing about innovative technologies that enable the portsairportsmining and tunnelling and general industries to operate more sustainably and work more productively. We shall be following the development of this particular approach with interest.

Image: Martin Pettitt, Wikimedia Commons